Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults

What does Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults mean?

Safeguarding vulnerable adult means protecting the vulnerable adult’s right to live in a safe environment, free from abuse, and neglect.

The Care Act 2014

The Care Act 2014 details the responsibility that the Local Authority and other parts of the system have in safeguarding vulnerable adults.

The Local Authority have certain duties in protecting vulnerable adults who are at risk of harm, such as:

  • Making, or requesting others to make enquiries – where it is believed that an adult is experiencing, or is at risk of harm, and neglect. From these enquiries it will establish if any action needs to be taken, and by who to stop the abuse or harm.
  • Establishing Safeguarding Adults Boards
  • Carrying out Safeguarding Adult Reviews
  • Leading a multi-agency local adult safeguarding system
  • Arranging for an independent advocate – to support the individual who is at the centre of the safeguarding review.

All agencies, and professionals involved in the care of the individual need to work together to stop abuse, and harm from occurring. It is the duty of all professionals to protect vulnerable adults and ensure their safety.

Who is responsible?

Protecting vulnerable adults, is everyone’s responsibility.

This includes the local authority, health professionals, care providers, police, and even the public!

The Care Act 2014

The Care Act 2014 details the responsibility that the Local Authority and other parts of the system have in safeguarding vulnerable adults.

The Local Authority have certain duties in protecting vulnerable adults who are at risk of harm, such as:

  • Making, or requesting others to make enquiries – where it is believed that an adult is experiencing, or is at risk of harm, and neglect. From these enquiries it will establish if any action needs to be taken, and by who to stop the abuse or harm.
  • Establishing Safeguarding Adults Boards
  • Carrying out Safeguarding Adult Reviews
  • Leading a multi-agency local adult safeguarding system
  • Arranging for an independent advocate – to support the individual who is at the centre of the safeguarding review.

All agencies, and professionals involved in the care of the individual need to work together to stop abuse, and harm from occurring. It is the duty of all professionals to protect vulnerable adults and ensure their safety.

Who is a Vulnerable Adult?

The Department of Health defines a vulnerable adult as:

  • 18 years or over
  • Who may be receiving, or in need of community care services due to mental or other disability, age or illness.
  • Who is or may be unable to take care of themselves

Or

  • Unable to protect themselves from significant harm, or abuse

Signs to look out for

It is important to spot signs if someone is being abused, as the earlier you detect, the sooner the abuse can be stopped, and help can be given to the vulnerable adult. Such as:

  • Being quiet, and withdrawn, not wanting to be left alone.
  • Being aggressive or angry for no apparent reason
  • Unexplained and recurrent injuries such as bruises
  • Looking unkempt, untidy

 

Types of Abuse

  • Physical abuse: Assault, hitting, slapping, pushing, misuse of medication, restraint or inappropriate physical sanctions.
  • Sexual Abuse: rape, and sexual assault, or sexual acts that are non-consensual or forced consent.
  • Psychological abuse: Emotional abuse, threats of harm, or abandonment, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion, or unreasonable and unjustified withdrawal or services or supportive network, isolation, verbal abuse, and harassment.
  • Financial or material abuse: theft, fraud, exploitation, coercion in relation to an adult’s financial affairs, or arrangements, including in connection with wills, property, inheritance, or financial transactions, or the misuse or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits.
  • Neglect or act of Omission: ignoring medical or physical care needs, failure to provide access to appropriate health, care and support or educational services, the withholding of the necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition and heating.
  • Discriminatory abuse: Discrimination on grounds of race, gender, and gender identity, disability, sexual orientation, religion, and other forms of harassment, slurs or similar treatment.

Modern Slavery

 

Sources

 

 

 

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