An unsolicited testimonial

Harry (not a family member) for whom we held Power of Attorney was cared for by Abbey Care and Support Services for four years. Staying with Abbey for this length of time, when we could have changed the care agency at any time is of itself a measure of our satisfaction with the agency.

Throughout the four years carers showed genuine care, concern and compassion and did more than simply carry out tasks of care for which they were paid.

During this time care was carried out by a small team who could always be relied upon to arrive on time. Inevitably, over four years some carers changed, though staff changes were infrequent. When a carer left, we wondered how they could be replaced, only to find the new carer just as good and caring as the one who had left. In total, over the four years, Harry probably had little more than a dozen carers who provided care 3 and lately 4 times a day seven days a week.

The small team was able to provide consistent and reliable care. There were times when issues cropped up which needed further discussion with the office. These issues were always promptly attended to in a knowledgeable and courteous way. Working together, putting the interests of Harry first made resolution of any issues easier.

Harry presented carers with many difficulties which they took in their stride showing both understanding and compassion.

It is the small gestures of kindness of the carers we will remember:

  • Kneeling beside Harry, not standing over him.
  • Holding his hand to comfort him.
  • Combing his hair and giving him a shave when they didn’t have to.

Not infrequently, and of their own accord, carers brought him items of food and other treats when he would eat little. In fact carers did those things any caring member of a family would have done but certainly not what any paid employee would have done.

For the people who cared for Harry and those we have met from Abbey Care and Support Services we say a very sincere thank you.

 

Julie & Steve

Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults

What does Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults mean?

Safeguarding vulnerable adult means protecting the vulnerable adult’s right to live in a safe environment, free from abuse, and neglect.

The Care Act 2014

The Care Act 2014 details the responsibility that the Local Authority and other parts of the system have in safeguarding vulnerable adults.

The Local Authority have certain duties in protecting vulnerable adults who are at risk of harm, such as:

  • Making, or requesting others to make enquiries – where it is believed that an adult is experiencing, or is at risk of harm, and neglect. From these enquiries it will establish if any action needs to be taken, and by who to stop the abuse or harm.
  • Establishing Safeguarding Adults Boards
  • Carrying out Safeguarding Adult Reviews
  • Leading a multi-agency local adult safeguarding system
  • Arranging for an independent advocate – to support the individual who is at the centre of the safeguarding review.

All agencies, and professionals involved in the care of the individual need to work together to stop abuse, and harm from occurring. It is the duty of all professionals to protect vulnerable adults and ensure their safety.

Who is responsible?

Protecting vulnerable adults, is everyone’s responsibility.

This includes the local authority, health professionals, care providers, police, and even the public!

The Care Act 2014

The Care Act 2014 details the responsibility that the Local Authority and other parts of the system have in safeguarding vulnerable adults.

The Local Authority have certain duties in protecting vulnerable adults who are at risk of harm, such as:

  • Making, or requesting others to make enquiries – where it is believed that an adult is experiencing, or is at risk of harm, and neglect. From these enquiries it will establish if any action needs to be taken, and by who to stop the abuse or harm.
  • Establishing Safeguarding Adults Boards
  • Carrying out Safeguarding Adult Reviews
  • Leading a multi-agency local adult safeguarding system
  • Arranging for an independent advocate – to support the individual who is at the centre of the safeguarding review.

All agencies, and professionals involved in the care of the individual need to work together to stop abuse, and harm from occurring. It is the duty of all professionals to protect vulnerable adults and ensure their safety.

Who is a Vulnerable Adult?

The Department of Health defines a vulnerable adult as:

  • 18 years or over
  • Who may be receiving, or in need of community care services due to mental or other disability, age or illness.
  • Who is or may be unable to take care of themselves

Or

  • Unable to protect themselves from significant harm, or abuse

Signs to look out for

It is important to spot signs if someone is being abused, as the earlier you detect, the sooner the abuse can be stopped, and help can be given to the vulnerable adult. Such as:

  • Being quiet, and withdrawn, not wanting to be left alone.
  • Being aggressive or angry for no apparent reason
  • Unexplained and recurrent injuries such as bruises
  • Looking unkempt, untidy

 

Types of Abuse

  • Physical abuse: Assault, hitting, slapping, pushing, misuse of medication, restraint or inappropriate physical sanctions.
  • Sexual Abuse: rape, and sexual assault, or sexual acts that are non-consensual or forced consent.
  • Psychological abuse: Emotional abuse, threats of harm, or abandonment, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion, or unreasonable and unjustified withdrawal or services or supportive network, isolation, verbal abuse, and harassment.
  • Financial or material abuse: theft, fraud, exploitation, coercion in relation to an adult’s financial affairs, or arrangements, including in connection with wills, property, inheritance, or financial transactions, or the misuse or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits.
  • Neglect or act of Omission: ignoring medical or physical care needs, failure to provide access to appropriate health, care and support or educational services, the withholding of the necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition and heating.
  • Discriminatory abuse: Discrimination on grounds of race, gender, and gender identity, disability, sexual orientation, religion, and other forms of harassment, slurs or similar treatment.

Modern Slavery

 

Sources

 

 

 

Dementia

Dementia

What is dementia?

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders, that is, conditions affecting the brain. There are many different types of dementia, of which Alzheimer’s disease is the most common. Some people may have a combination of types of dementia.  Regardless of which type is diagnosed, each person will experience their dementia in their own unique way.

The four most common types of dementia are:

Alzheimer’s disease

Vascular dementia

Frontotemporal

Dementia with Lewy bodies

Symptoms of dementia

Memory problems – People with dementia might have problems retaining new information. They might get lost and confused in previously familiar places and may struggle with names, dates etc. Relatives might notice the person seems increasingly forgetful, misplacing things regularly.

Cognitive ability, i.e. processing information – People with dementia may have difficulty with time and place, for example, getting up in the middle of the night to go to work, even though they’re retired. Also their concentration could be affected. There may be a difficulty when shopping with choosing the items and then paying for them. For some people suffering with dementia the ability to reason and make decisions is affected.

Communication – People suffering with dementia tend to repeat themselves often and have difficulty finding the right words. Reading and writing might become challenging. They may well experience changes in personality and behaviour, mood swings, anxiety and depression.  People with dementia tend lose interest in seeing others socially. Following and engaging in conversation can be difficult and tiring. Their self-confidence is likely be affected.

Dementia can be seen as a combination of one, or all of the above symptoms. If you or someone you know is experiencing one or more of these symptoms, early diagnosis is the vital. There are many other reasons someone might be experiencing confusion or memory problems, so it is best to get them checked.

It is very important to get the right help when you or a family member is suffering from dementia, speak to your GP and they will guide to you the right place. You or your family member can also seek help from local authorities who will then assess you using something called the community care/needs assessment and get you the eligible help and support you need. Your family, GP or professional involved in your care can contact them.

(Source: Dementia UK)

How to contact the relevant people to get help?

 

https://www.unforgettable.org/blog/what-are-the-stages-of-dementia/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkYaq5JWj2QIVbyjTCh0ZdgjqEAAYASAAEgIKG_D_BwE

https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/info/20046/help_with_dementia_care/79/carers_looking_after_yourself/4

 

Contact Numbers

Carers UK: 0808 808 7777

Dementia UK: 0800 888 6678

Leicester Adult Social Care: 0116 454 1004

Leicestershire County Council: 0116 305 0004